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WHEN IS THE RIGHT TIME?

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Persistent difficulty with memory, cognition and ability to perform everyday tasks might be signs of something more serious.

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From age 50 on, it’s not unusual to have occasional trouble finding the right word or remembering where you put things. But persistent difficulty with memory, cognition and ability to perform everyday tasks might be signs of something more serious.

Dementia is a term used for changes in the brain that cause a loss of functioning that interferes with daily life. It can diminish focus, the ability to pay attention, language skills, problem-solving and visual perception. Dementia can also make it difficult for a person to control his or her emotions and can even lead to personality changes. 

If someone is showing signs of dementia, it’s important to see a medical expert who can conduct tests and come up with a diagnosis. Several, often treatable, conditions — from infections to a vitamin deficiency — can cause dementia-like symptoms, so it’s necessary to rule them out first. Some people who experience memory loss or have difficulty with attention, decision-making language or reasoning may have a condition known as mild cognitive impairment (MCI). The condition causes a noticeable decline, but the changes are less severe than with dementia and a person can still perform normal daily activities, according to the Cleveland Clinic.

When your loved one is displaying troubling symptoms, a trip to a primary care physician is often the first step. But to get a definitive diagnosis, you may need to see a specialist. 

If it is dementia, you’ll want to plan how you will manage care, especially as the condition progresses. Here are some symptoms to watch for:

  1. Difficulty with everyday tasks. People with dementia may find it increasingly difficult to do things like keep track of monthly bills or follow a recipe while cooking, the Alzheimer’s Association says. They may also find it hard to concentrate on tasks, take much longer to do them or have trouble finishing them.
  2. Repetition. Asking a question over and over or telling the same story about a recent event multiple times are common indicators of mild or moderate Alzheimer's, according to the Cleveland Clinic.
  3. Communication problems. Observe if a loved one has trouble joining in conversations or following along with them, stops abruptly in the middle of a thought or struggles to think of words or the name of objects.
  4. Getting lost. People with dementia may have difficulty with visual and spatial abilities. That can manifest itself in problems like getting lost while driving, according to the Mayo Clinic.
  5. Personality changes. A loved one who begins acting unusually anxious, confused, fearful or suspicious, or who becomes upset easily and seems depressed is cause for concern.
  6. Confusion about time and place. If someone forgets where they are or can’t remember how they got there, that's a red flag. Another worrisome sign is disorientation about time — for example, routinely forgetting what day of the week it is.
  7. Misplacing things. Someone with dementia may put things in unusual places and may have difficulty retracing their steps to find misplaced items, the Alzheimer’s Association notes. 
  8. Troubling behavior. If your family member seems to have increasingly poor judgment when handling money or neglects grooming and cleanliness, pay attention.
  9. Loss of interest. Not feeling especially social from time to time is one thing, but a sudden and routine loss of interest in family, friends, work and social events can be a warning sign of dementia. 
  10. Forgetting old memories. Memory loss that becomes more persistent is often one of the first signs of dementia. 

If you find that it’s time to seek assistance for a loved one, the dedicated staff at The Gardens of Georgia Tucker Memory Care will be pleased to provide a tour of our facility and answer questions about our specialized daily care.

In your search, evaluation of the atmosphere, caring culture, helpful activities, and essential services all weigh in as important factors. We’ve taken carefully planned steps to ensure provisions of a gracious lifestyle for adults who need assisted living, and for adults who require care taken a step further with memory care services which includes all the expected amenities along with an individualized plan of care to maximize quality of life. Full accreditation and a certified staff ensure proper attention.

The unparalleled comfort, convenience, and amenities of The Gardens At Georgia Tucker Assisted Living and Memory Care assure residents of an environment that can truly be called home.

Deciding when the timing is right to relocate a loved is not always easy. Finding the right community takes time, and that’s why the Georgia Tucker administration staff is pleased to show you around, answer any questions, and provide helpful information for you or a loved one. Call 318-538-0040 to schedule a tour appointment and visit GeorgiaTucker.com for more details.

405 Stubbs Avenue | Monroe LA
318-538-0040
info@georgiatucker.com

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